Week ending May 29, 2016

FROM OUR FACEBOOK PAGE

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An overriding theme at the HOPE graduation last week at the Central Utah Correctional Facility? Perseverance. From the skit presented by some inmates to remarks by guest speaker and UFC pro Court McGee, graduates were encouraged to keep focused on their dreams and never give up.

IN COURT

Woman sent to prison again for running Ponzi scheme by Will Feelright, Cache Valley Daily

“A 54-year-old Logan woman, Lori Ann Anderson, is being sent to prison again after running a Ponzi scheme and bilking 46 investors out of more than $1.7 million.”

UTAH BOARD OF PARDONS AND PAROLE

Ogden killer to spend at least 10 more years in prison by Pamela Manson, The Salt Lake Tribune

“An Ogden man who beat his wife to death in 1995 will spend at least another decade behind bars.”

STORIES OF INTEREST

Machine Bias: There’s Software Used Across the Country to Predict Future Criminals. And it’s biased against blacks by

A look at prison nurseries nationwide by The Associated Press in Fox News

“Out of more than 100 women’s prisons in the U.S., only eight have nursery programs that allow mothers to help raise their babies behind bars.”

Prison program lets inmate moms send their voices ‘Beyond Our Walls’ by Rick Lee, YDR.com

“In York County Prison for six to 23 months on a probation violation for a retail theft conviction, Stephanie Schymansky misses her two young sons.”

Local Labor Markets and Criminal Recidivism by Crystal S. Yang, (Working Paper, Harvard.edu)

“This paper estimates the impact of local labor market conditions on criminal recidivism using rich administrative prison records on over four million offenders released from 43 states between 2000 and 2013.”

He was an inmate. Now he’s a Ph.D., and he wants to pay it forward by Parker Molloy, Unworthy

“For many former convicts, punishment extends far beyond the time they spent in prison. A National Institute of Justice study found that 60-75% of individuals are unable to find workwithin the first year of being released from prison. With increased unemployment comes increased chances that they will return to their previous habits, winding up back in prison, and continuing a disturbing cycle.”

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