Week ending Nov. 8, 2015

PRISON DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION

State to hire firm to manage construction of new prison ‘as soon as possible’ by Lisa Riley Roche, Deseret News

“Nearly two months after their first meeting, members of the Prison Development Commission adopted recommendations that include hiring a firm “as soon as possible” to manage construction of a new 4,000-bed prison.”

COMMUNITY SERVICES

Women caught up in the justice system take a Journey of Hope by Stephen Dark, City Weekly

“On Thursday Nov. 4, 2015 the long-cherished dream of a group of women with decades of experience working in the Utah Department of Corrections—or, in some cases, experience as inmates—finally came to life with the launch of Journey of Hope, a peer mentoring program that has already had some success in helping women avoid the cycle of re-incarceration.”

RESTRICTIVE HOUSING

End solitary confinement at new state prison ACLU says by Brian Mullahy, KUTV

“Utah’s ACLU has called for an end to a penal system practice that has been poised down through the ages.”

LAW ENFORCEMENT NEWS

ICE crackdown: Hundreds of criminal immigrants nabbed in Utah, other western states by  Bob Mims, The Salt Lake Tribune

“A multistate crackdown on criminal immigrants in the United States illegally resulted in 235 arrests in four states, including 111 in Utah.”

Federal fugitive, second suspect nabbed in Taylorsville traffic stop by Bob Mims, The Salt Lake Tribune

“A federal fugitive with alleged Utah gang ties was arrested after fleeing on foot from a traffic stop early Friday morning in Taylorsville.”

IN MEMORIAM

Holli Simmonds

STORIES OF INTEREST

The Dissenters by Maurice Chammah, The Marshall Project

“If you had to pick a single word to sum up all that has happened in Washington over the last year on the subject of criminal justice, it might be ‘bipartisanship.’ Or maybe ‘kumbaya.’”

Beekeeping firm that helps ex-prisoners back on their feet is a sweet success by Ryan Schuessler, The Guardian

“Reggie Davis was only nine years old when he started selling drugs, before living the next three decades in and out of prison. His story isn’t uncommon in Chicago’s North Lawndale neighborhood, where unemployment is almost triple the city’s average.”

Report: One in 14 children has had incarcerated parent by Melanie Eversley, USA Today

“One in 14 children have at least one parent behind bars and children in these situations suffer from low self esteem, poor mental and physical health, and other problems, a national research organization says.”

In spotlight, Florida prisons impose new rules on use of force by Carli Teproff, Miami Herald

“Under intense scrutiny over allegations of prison abuse, the Florida Department of Corrections has imposed new restrictions on when force can be used on inmates and how officers have to document the situations.”

Who are the people in federal prison for drug crimes? by Mark Berman, The Washington Post

“Thousands of federal prisoners have been released in recent days, their sentences reduced amid a growing, bipartisan sentiment that harsh punishments for drug offenders put into place in recent decades were too severe.”

Support for prison overhaul fits conservative ideals, Labrador says by Ali Montag, Idaho Statesman

“Rep. Raul Labrador, one of the most conservative members of the House Republican conference, has helped engineer a bill that would overhaul decades-old federal sentencing guidelines, giving judges more leeway and offering criminals the hope of less time in prison.”

California’s early release of prisoners proving effective so far, Stanford experts say by Clifton B. Parker, Stanford News

“Reforming California’s criminal justice system with the early release of prisoners is a step in the right direction, according to Stanford law experts who see a larger problem in America’s approach to incarceration.”

OPINION: Here’s a way to be tough on crime — without being tough on taxpayers by Pat Nolan and Julie Stewart, PennLive

“An unlikely issue is finding consensus among liberals and conservatives, progressives and the tea party. After decades of experimentation, mandatory minimum sentencing laws have failed in every respect.  For this reason, leaders of all political persuasions are moving public policy in this country away from mandatory minimums.”

OPINION: Employ ex-cons: Here’s a tangible proposal by The Montclair Times Editorial

“For several years, The Montclair Times has advocated a plan to employ ex-convicts. This plan has merits for the people released from prison, for people who believe in rehabilitation, and for people who insist that the government, in all its permutations, carefully spend revenues reaped from residents.”

Congress: Side by Side of 3 #JusticeReform Bills with the Most Co-Sponsors by Lauren Victoria Burke, Politic365

 

This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.